Renée Montagne

co-host, NPR's Morning Edition

Renee Montagne is host of NPR’s Morning Edition, the most widely heard broadcast news program in the United States. Since 2004, she has been broadcasting from NPR West in Culver City, California, with cohost Steve Inskeep in Washington. Over the years, Montagne has done thousands of interviews on a wide range of topics: Kurt Vonnegut on how he transformed surviving the WWII firebombing of Dresden into the novel Slaughterhouse Five; National Guardsmen on how they handle the holidays in Iraq; Paul McCartney on singing the old songs; a Hollywood historian on how the famous hillside sign came to be; Toni Morrison on the dreams and memories she turned into novels; and Bud Montagne, Renee’s father, remembering the attack on Pearl Harbor. In addition to the duPont Columbia Award, Montagne has been honored by the Overseas Press Club for her coverage of Afghanistan, and by the National Association of Black Journalists for a series on Black musicians going to war. She earned a B.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley, graduating Phi Beta Kappa. Her career includes serving as a fellow at the University of Southern California with the National Arts Journalism Program (currently based at Columbia University), and teaching broadcast writing at New York University’s Graduate Department of Journalism.

Renee Montagne is host of NPR’s Morning Edition, the most widely heard broadcast news program in the United States. Since 2004, she has been broadcasting from NPR West in Culver City, California, with cohost Steve Inskeep in Washington. Over the years, Montagne has done thousands of interviews on a wide range of topics: Kurt Vonnegut on how he transformed surviving the WWII firebombing of Dresden into the novel Slaughterhouse Five; National Guardsmen on how they handle the holidays in Iraq; Paul McCartney on singing the old songs; a Hollywood historian on how the famous hillside sign came to be; Toni Morrison on the dreams and memories she turned into novels; and Bud Montagne, Renee’s father, remembering the attack on Pearl Harbor. In addition to the duPont Columbia Award, Montagne has been honored by the Overseas Press Club for her coverage of Afghanistan, and by the National Association of Black Journalists for a series on Black musicians going to war. She earned a B.A. in English from the University of California, Berkeley, graduating Phi Beta Kappa. Her career includes serving as a fellow at the University of Southern California with the National Arts Journalism Program (currently based at Columbia University), and teaching broadcast writing at New York University’s Graduate Department of Journalism.

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