What Will Work Look Like In The Future?

The first Monday in September in the United States is set aside as a holiday to recognize the works and contributions of laborers to the development and achievements of the United States. The occassion began nearly 130 years ago and became an official holiday in 1894. Over time the holiday has become Labor Day Weekend—an extra day added to a weekend, a last hurrah for summer.

The era when most laborers were tilling soil, building railways, riveting on factory lines and sweating in steel mills all come to mind as the labor that built the U.S., but what does that labor look like today? What industries are building the future? Where do we toil?

This series of talks features experts who look at the current state of work and what it could be in the not-so-far future.

Photo: ICAPlants / CC BY-SA

The first Monday in September in the United States is set aside as a holiday to recognize the works and contributions of laborers to the development and achievements of the United States. The occassion began nearly 130 years ago and became an official holiday in 1894. Over time the holiday has become Labor Day Weekend—an extra day added to a weekend, a last hurrah for summer.

The era when most laborers were tilling soil, building railways, riveting on factory lines and sweating in steel mills all come to mind as the labor that built the U.S., but what does that labor look like today? What industries are building the future? Where do we toil?

This series of talks features experts who look at the current state of work and what it could be in the not-so-far future.

Photo: ICAPlants / CC BY-SA