American Experience: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln Series

Lectures curated around American Experience: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, which recounts the great drama surrounding America’s first assassinated president and celebrates the bicentennial of his birth in 1809. On March 4, 1865 at the United States Capitol, a crowd of fifty thousand listened as President Lincoln delivered his classic second inaugural address, urging charity and forgiveness to a nation in the final throes of war. Just two months later, a train, nine cars long and draped in black bunting pulled slowly out of a station in Washington, D.C. Dignitaries and government officials crowded the first eight cars. In the ninth rode the body of Abraham Lincoln, America’s first assassinated president. Some seven million people would line the tracks or file past the casket to bid an emotional farewell to the martyred leader. As the funeral train made its way across nine states and through hundreds of cities and towns, the largest manhunt in history was closing in on Lincoln’s assassin, the famous actor John Wilkes Booth.

Lectures curated around American Experience: The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, which recounts the great drama surrounding America’s first assassinated president and celebrates the bicentennial of his birth in 1809. On March 4, 1865 at the United States Capitol, a crowd of fifty thousand listened as President Lincoln delivered his classic second inaugural address, urging charity and forgiveness to a nation in the final throes of war. Just two months later, a train, nine cars long and draped in black bunting pulled slowly out of a station in Washington, D.C. Dignitaries and government officials crowded the first eight cars. In the ninth rode the body of Abraham Lincoln, America’s first assassinated president. Some seven million people would line the tracks or file past the casket to bid an emotional farewell to the martyred leader. As the funeral train made its way across nine states and through hundreds of cities and towns, the largest manhunt in history was closing in on Lincoln’s assassin, the famous actor John Wilkes Booth.

Lectures