Scandal on the Stage: Banned Theater in Boston

THU, MAY 1, 2003 (1:11:32)

This program includes vignettes of censored plays in Boston, beginning with the Puritan censorship of Morton’s Maypole and climaxing with the 1929 banning of Eugene O’Neill’s Freudian theatrical experiment, Strange Interlude. A panel discusses the performances, the historical ideas of censorship, and what forms censorship takes today.

+ BIO: John D. Anderson

Dr. Anderson, a performance studies scholar, earned his BA and MA from Baylor University and his PhD from University of Texas in Austin. He focuses his research in the area of narrative theory and performance. He is the author of The Student Companion to William Faulkner (Greenwood, 2007). In addition to publishing articles in Text and Performance Quarterly, he has served as book review co-editor for the journal. He performs nationally in his one-person shows as authors Henry James, William Faulkner, Washington Irving, Lynn Riggs, and Robert Frost. An audio podcast of his performance as Frost at the Seattle Public Library is accessible at http://www.spl.org/Audio/RobertFrost.mp3. He has received Chautauqua grants to present humanities programs on early America, the Civil War, the 1930s, and the Centennial of Oklahoma statehood. Dr. Anderson is a former Chair of the Performance Studies Division of the National Communication Association and served as Director of the Honors Program at Emerson for ten years.

+ BIO: Matthew Chapuran

Matt Chapuran joined the Stoneham Theatre staff after three years monitoring the fiscal performance of a national portfolio of 80 affordable housing properties for Boston Capital. Previously, he was the managing director of the Nora Theatre Company, based in Cambridge. Recently, Matt concluded a month long project teaching improvisation to MBA candidates at Babson College. He regularly contributed articles on property management andinformation services to various industry publications.

Partner
Old South Meeting House
Series
Boston's 375th Anniversary Series
Talking Heads Series
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