Ian Morris

professor, classics and history, Stanford University

Ian Morris is the Willard Professor of Classics and History at Stanford University. He has served as associate dean of Humanities and Sciences, chair of the Classics Department, and director of the Social Science History Institute. Morris is founder and former director of the Stanford Archaeology Center.

He is a prolific scholar who is best known for his work on early Iron Age Greece. Morris is the author of Why the West Rules—For Now: The Patterns of History and What They Reveal about the Future; Burial and Ancient Society; and Death-Ritual and Social Structure in Classical Antiquity.

From 2000 through 2006, he directed Stanford University's excavation at Monte Polizzo, a native Sicilian town of the seventh and sixth centuries BCE.

Morris has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C., the Institute for Research in the Humanities at University of Wisconsin-Madison and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Ian Morris is the Willard Professor of Classics and History at Stanford University. He has served as associate dean of Humanities and Sciences, chair of the Classics Department, and director of the Social Science History Institute. Morris is founder and former director of the Stanford Archaeology Center.

He is a prolific scholar who is best known for his work on early Iron Age Greece. Morris is the author of Why the West Rules—For Now: The Patterns of History and What They Reveal about the Future; Burial and Ancient Society; and Death-Ritual and Social Structure in Classical Antiquity.

From 2000 through 2006, he directed Stanford University's excavation at Monte Polizzo, a native Sicilian town of the seventh and sixth centuries BCE.

Morris has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C., the Institute for Research in the Humanities at University of Wisconsin-Madison and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Website
www.stanford.edu

Books
Lectures