Scott Doney

Professor in Environmental Change, University of Virginia

Scott Doney researched oceanography, climate and biogeochemistry, with an emphasis on numerical models, remote sensing, and data analysis. He is interested in how the global carbon cycle and ocean ecology respond to natural and human-driven climate change signals such as ocean warming, sea-ice loss, and ocean acidification due to the invasion of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning.

Before joining the University of Virginia, Doney was a senior scientist in the Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.He graduated with a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution joint program in 1991 and was a postdoctoral fellow and later a scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, before returning to Woods Hole in 2002. He was awarded the James B. Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union in 2000 and was a 2004 Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow.

Scott Doney researched oceanography, climate and biogeochemistry, with an emphasis on numerical models, remote sensing, and data analysis. He is interested in how the global carbon cycle and ocean ecology respond to natural and human-driven climate change signals such as ocean warming, sea-ice loss, and ocean acidification due to the invasion of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning.

Before joining the University of Virginia, Doney was a senior scientist in the Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.He graduated with a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution joint program in 1991 and was a postdoctoral fellow and later a scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, before returning to Woods Hole in 2002. He was awarded the James B. Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union in 2000 and was a 2004 Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow.

Website
www.evsc.virginia.edu