Mark Boswell

Mark has lived in the Boston area since 1997, working as a software engineer in Cambridge and Boston. During that time, he has always preferred to get around the city by bicycle, including daily commuting year-round, as well as routine errands throughout North and Mid-Cambridge. In 2014 Mark decided to go car-free, selling his car and embracing the bicycle as his primary mode of travel. He has not regretted the choice for a moment. He believes that bicycling is the most efficient, cleanest, quietest and most enjoyable way to move about the city. Urban spaces that support safe bicycling are also livable spaces that prioritize humans. Bicycling provides equitable mobility and access to all communities, particularly those not well-served by the MBTA. Mark would like to see a complete network of safe bicycle routes connecting all major destinations in the region, because it would encourage ridership of the large number of potential bicyclists who say they would like to ride on city streets, but are too concerned about safety. His desire to see this goal become a reality has motivated him to become involved in advocacy groups such as Cambridge Bicycle Safety and Boston Cyclists Union. When not working or riding one of his five bicycles, Mark enjoys traveling to destinations where bicycling is a mandatory component of the experience.

Mark has lived in the Boston area since 1997, working as a software engineer in Cambridge and Boston. During that time, he has always preferred to get around the city by bicycle, including daily commuting year-round, as well as routine errands throughout North and Mid-Cambridge. In 2014 Mark decided to go car-free, selling his car and embracing the bicycle as his primary mode of travel. He has not regretted the choice for a moment. He believes that bicycling is the most efficient, cleanest, quietest and most enjoyable way to move about the city. Urban spaces that support safe bicycling are also livable spaces that prioritize humans. Bicycling provides equitable mobility and access to all communities, particularly those not well-served by the MBTA. Mark would like to see a complete network of safe bicycle routes connecting all major destinations in the region, because it would encourage ridership of the large number of potential bicyclists who say they would like to ride on city streets, but are too concerned about safety. His desire to see this goal become a reality has motivated him to become involved in advocacy groups such as Cambridge Bicycle Safety and Boston Cyclists Union. When not working or riding one of his five bicycles, Mark enjoys traveling to destinations where bicycling is a mandatory component of the experience.

Lectures