Civil Rights Movement Series

Lectures examining the Civil Rights Movement from Brown v. Board of Education to the civil and human rights initiatives today.

The American Civil Rights Movement (1955-1968) refers to reform movements in the United States aimed at abolishing public and private acts of racial discrimination against African Americans. By 1966, the emergence of the Black Power Movement, which lasted roughly from 1966 to 1975, enlarged and gradually eclipsed the aims of the Civil Rights Movement to include racial dignity, economic and political self-sufficiency, and freedom from white authority. Several scholars refer to the Civil Rights Movement as the Second Reconstruction, a name that alludes to the Reconstruction after the Civil War.

Timeline: Brown v. Board of Education, 1954 Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1955-1956 Mass Action Replaces Litigation, 1955-1965 Tallahassee, Florida Boycott, 1956-1957 Desegregating Little Rock, 1957 The Kennedy Administration, 1960-63 Freedom Riders, 1961 Council of Federated Organizations, 1962 The Albany Movement, 1961-1967 The March on Washington, 1963 The Birmingham Campaign, 1963-1964 Race Riots, 1963-1970 The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, 1964 Martin Luther King, Jr. awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, 1964 Selma and the Voting Rights Act, 1965 Black Power, 1966 Memphis and the Poor People's March, 1968 Gates v. Collier Prison Reform Case, 1970-1971

Lectures examining the Civil Rights Movement from Brown v. Board of Education to the civil and human rights initiatives today.

The American Civil Rights Movement (1955-1968) refers to reform movements in the United States aimed at abolishing public and private acts of racial discrimination against African Americans. By 1966, the emergence of the Black Power Movement, which lasted roughly from 1966 to 1975, enlarged and gradually eclipsed the aims of the Civil Rights Movement to include racial dignity, economic and political self-sufficiency, and freedom from white authority. Several scholars refer to the Civil Rights Movement as the Second Reconstruction, a name that alludes to the Reconstruction after the Civil War.

Timeline: Brown v. Board of Education, 1954 Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1955-1956 Mass Action Replaces Litigation, 1955-1965 Tallahassee, Florida Boycott, 1956-1957 Desegregating Little Rock, 1957 The Kennedy Administration, 1960-63 Freedom Riders, 1961 Council of Federated Organizations, 1962 The Albany Movement, 1961-1967 The March on Washington, 1963 The Birmingham Campaign, 1963-1964 Race Riots, 1963-1970 The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, 1964 Martin Luther King, Jr. awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, 1964 Selma and the Voting Rights Act, 1965 Black Power, 1966 Memphis and the Poor People's March, 1968 Gates v. Collier Prison Reform Case, 1970-1971