American Experience: RFK Series

Lectures curated around American Experience: RFK that explores Robert Kennedy's enormous capacity for growth as a person and as a leader, as defined by the death of his brother.

Robert Francis Kennedy would almost certainly have been president if his violent death hadn't intervened. He was brave, claims one biographer, "precisely because he was fearful and self-doubting." This probing and perceptive biography reassesses the remarkable and tragic life of the third Kennedy son, the boy Joe Sr. called the "runt." Featuring extensive interviews with family members, friends, journalists, Washington insiders, and civil rights activists, the film chronicles the pivotal role RFK played in many of the major events of the 1960s - the Cuban Missile Crisis, the civil rights movement, the war in Vietnam. The film looks closely at Kennedy's complicated relationships with some of the leading figures of his day, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Lyndon B. Johnson, among them. And it reveals much about his personal world, his role as family mediator, his involvement with Marilyn Monroe, and his overwhelming grief and guilt following the assassination of his older brother.

Lectures curated around American Experience: RFK that explores Robert Kennedy's enormous capacity for growth as a person and as a leader, as defined by the death of his brother.

Robert Francis Kennedy would almost certainly have been president if his violent death hadn't intervened. He was brave, claims one biographer, "precisely because he was fearful and self-doubting." This probing and perceptive biography reassesses the remarkable and tragic life of the third Kennedy son, the boy Joe Sr. called the "runt." Featuring extensive interviews with family members, friends, journalists, Washington insiders, and civil rights activists, the film chronicles the pivotal role RFK played in many of the major events of the 1960s - the Cuban Missile Crisis, the civil rights movement, the war in Vietnam. The film looks closely at Kennedy's complicated relationships with some of the leading figures of his day, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Lyndon B. Johnson, among them. And it reveals much about his personal world, his role as family mediator, his involvement with Marilyn Monroe, and his overwhelming grief and guilt following the assassination of his older brother.

Lectures

4.25.2004 (1:24:07)

RFK Remembered

10.28.2002 (1:31:18)

Cuban Missile Crisis and the Media