American Experience: The Presidents Series

Lectures curated around American Experience: The Presidents, an in-depth look at some of the most powerful men in the world.

American Experience: The Presidents comprises seven films covering FDR, Truman, Reagan, Johnson, Nixon, and Carter all viewable online and available for download. A new profile of the 41st President, George H. W. Bush, is also available online. Henry Adams, the American historian and the grandson and great-grandson of presidents, said the president "resembles the commander of a ship at sea. He must have a helm to grasp, a course to steer, a port to seek." Each of our presidents has taken America on a different voyage, voyages shaped by how each sitting president has defined the institution of the presidency. Some have been more bold than others, working to mold public opinion and actively pushing their programs through Congress. Others have not ventured far, feeling that presidential intervention often causes more problems than it solves. One can look at the presidency in the 20th century and through the office see the drama of contemporary American history — war, economic hardship, women's rights, race relations, our triumphs and our failures — it is all there.

Lectures curated around American Experience: The Presidents, an in-depth look at some of the most powerful men in the world.

American Experience: The Presidents comprises seven films covering FDR, Truman, Reagan, Johnson, Nixon, and Carter all viewable online and available for download. A new profile of the 41st President, George H. W. Bush, is also available online. Henry Adams, the American historian and the grandson and great-grandson of presidents, said the president "resembles the commander of a ship at sea. He must have a helm to grasp, a course to steer, a port to seek." Each of our presidents has taken America on a different voyage, voyages shaped by how each sitting president has defined the institution of the presidency. Some have been more bold than others, working to mold public opinion and actively pushing their programs through Congress. Others have not ventured far, feeling that presidential intervention often causes more problems than it solves. One can look at the presidency in the 20th century and through the office see the drama of contemporary American history — war, economic hardship, women's rights, race relations, our triumphs and our failures — it is all there.