Aftershock: Coping with Disaster Series

Lectures curated around last year's earthquakes in Chile and Haiti, as well as two of the greatest natural disasters in modern times that occurred within less than a year of each other: the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami and the 2005 Hurricane Katrina.

These lectures underscore the unpredictable nature of our global environment, and the traumatic aftermath of natural disasters. They also reflect the enduring will of New Orleans, Southest Asia, Haiti, Chile, and peoples around the world who rebuild both the spirit and structures of these vital areas.

Watch the PBS television program Égalité for All: Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Revolution Friday, January 15 at 10pm on WGBH 2/HD, which profiles the only successful slave insurrection in history

The leaders of the Haitian Revolution (1791–1803) grasped the full meaning of French revolutionary ideas and used them to create the world’s first black republic. The event elevated a black general, former slave Toussaint Louverture (1743–1803), to such international fame that admirers ranked him on par with George Washington, and the movement has been called the birth moment of universal human rights. Vaguely remembered today, the Haitian Revolution was a hurricane at the turn of the 19th century, traumatizing Southern planters and inspiring American slaves. Égalité for All explores this history through music, voodoo ritual, dramatic re-creations, and the comments of insightful writers and historians.

Related Programs:

NPR: Chile, Haiti Quakes Explained NPR: Differences Between The Haiti And Chile Quakes

NPR: 'Massive' Earthquake Hits Chile; Tsunami Warnings Up Across Pacific NPR: Chile Reacts To 'Unparalleled' Earthquake Disaster NPR: U.S. Works To Deliver Earthquake Aid To Chile NPR: Rescue Effort Ramps Up In Chile; Death Toll Rises

NPR: Aid Efforts In Haiti: Multinational And DIY NPR: What Haiti Needs More Than Charity: Trade NPR: Picking Up The Pieces In Haiti NPR: Haiti Quake: Ruin And Recovery

Lectures curated around last year's earthquakes in Chile and Haiti, as well as two of the greatest natural disasters in modern times that occurred within less than a year of each other: the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami and the 2005 Hurricane Katrina.

These lectures underscore the unpredictable nature of our global environment, and the traumatic aftermath of natural disasters. They also reflect the enduring will of New Orleans, Southest Asia, Haiti, Chile, and peoples around the world who rebuild both the spirit and structures of these vital areas.

Watch the PBS television program Égalité for All: Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Revolution Friday, January 15 at 10pm on WGBH 2/HD, which profiles the only successful slave insurrection in history

The leaders of the Haitian Revolution (1791–1803) grasped the full meaning of French revolutionary ideas and used them to create the world’s first black republic. The event elevated a black general, former slave Toussaint Louverture (1743–1803), to such international fame that admirers ranked him on par with George Washington, and the movement has been called the birth moment of universal human rights. Vaguely remembered today, the Haitian Revolution was a hurricane at the turn of the 19th century, traumatizing Southern planters and inspiring American slaves. Égalité for All explores this history through music, voodoo ritual, dramatic re-creations, and the comments of insightful writers and historians.

Related Programs:

NPR: Chile, Haiti Quakes Explained NPR: Differences Between The Haiti And Chile Quakes

NPR: 'Massive' Earthquake Hits Chile; Tsunami Warnings Up Across Pacific NPR: Chile Reacts To 'Unparalleled' Earthquake Disaster NPR: U.S. Works To Deliver Earthquake Aid To Chile NPR: Rescue Effort Ramps Up In Chile; Death Toll Rises

NPR: Aid Efforts In Haiti: Multinational And DIY NPR: What Haiti Needs More Than Charity: Trade NPR: Picking Up The Pieces In Haiti NPR: Haiti Quake: Ruin And Recovery