Scapegoating: And Then They Came For Me

WED, MAR 16, 2016 (1:23:47)

Front and center in the news during the most unusual 2016 campaign for U.S. President was the growing rhetoric of hate and xenophobia. Digging beyond emotional reactions, it is critical to take a step back and get a broader view of how fear, blame and hate speech impact people through a constructive and historical lens.

Drawing on the experiences and analysis of a diverse panel of speakers, this event takes a look at the personal, the policy, and the politics surrounding this complex issue. The panel includes Dr. Donna Hicks, a bestselling author, professor of conflict resolution, and facilitator of diplomatic dialogues in the Middle East, Libya, and Syria; Jasmina Dervisevic-Cesic, an author, businesswoman, and human rights advocate who was the first Bosnian refugee granted permission to seek medical care in America; and Ken Gude, a Senior Fellow with the National Security Team at the Center for American Progress and expert on the intersection of law and security in the fight against terrorism. Dr. Aleisa Fishman, historian at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., moderates as the panelists offer their perspectives and their visions for the future.

(Image: Flickr/Ejaz Asi)

+ BIO: Aleisa Fishman

Dr. Aleisa Fishman is a historian at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. She encourages audiences to explore the history of the Holocaust and how that history remains relevant today. Dr. Fishman curates the Holocaust Memorial Museum's podcast interview series Confronting Hatred, part of the Museum's initiative against Holocaust denial and anti-Semitism.

+ BIO: Donna Hicks

Dr. Donna Hicks is a bestselling author and has taught courses in conflict resolution at Harvard, Clark and Columbia universities. She co-facilitated a BBC television series, Facing the Truth, with Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Dr. Hicks has facilitated dialogues in numerous unofficial diplomatic efforts in the Middle East, Libya and Syria. She is an Associate at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University.

+ BIO: Jasmina Dervisevic-Cevic

Jasmina Dervisevic-Cesic lost a home, a husband, two brothers and her right arm, all before she turned 20. She was the first Bosnian refugee granted permission to seek medical care in America. She is a businesswoman, human rights advocate, and frequent speaker in Facing History classrooms across New England, and she is the author of a memoir, The River Runs Salt, Runs Sweet: A Memoir of Visegrad, Bosnia (2014). In 2016, her memoir earned her recognition from Books In Common as a featured author.

+ BIO: Ken Gude

Ken Gude is a Senior Fellow with the National Security Team at the Center for American Progress. He is an expert on the intersection of law and security in the fight against terrorism. Prior to this, Gude was a policy analyst at the Center for National Security Studies, where he focused on post-September 11 civil liberties issues. He is a frequent contributor to print and broadcast media, including the LA Times and the Guardian.

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