Educating Black and Hispanic Youth

TUE, OCT 22, 2002 (1:26:01)

YWCA Boston and a panel of education administrators, teachers, and youth critically examine how Black and Hispanic students are faring in Boston's public schools, and asks what we can do as a community to strengthen our education system. This discussion takes us beyond the MCAS to what is really ailing our schools.

+ BIO: Callie Crossley

Callie Crossley is a woman for all media including commentator, public speaker, writer, broadcast journalist, and filmmaker. She appears regularly on National Public Radio (NPR News and Notes with Ed Gordon). She is best known to Bostonians for her weekly television commentary on the media criticism program, Beat the Press, an 8-year-old award-winning program examining local and national media coverage airing on WGBH-TV.

Prior to her current work, Ms. Crossley spent thirteen years as a network television Producer for ABC NEWS' 20/20 reporting health medical stories such as male menopause, breast cancer and young women, and the potential link between viral infection and recycled air in airplanes. In addition, she was a producer on the critically acclaimed PBS documentary series Eyes on the Prize: Americas Civil Rights Years 1954-1965. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences honored her hour on the series with an Oscar nomination for Best Documentary Feature. Crossley produced the documentary while working for Blackside, Inc., a Boston based independent film production company for which she most recently served as Senior Series Producer on the 2003 PBS documentary series This Far By Faith: African-American Spiritual Journeys. Callie Crossley is a graduate of Wellesley College, and was at Harvard University as a Nieman Fellow, a year long sabbatical for professional journalists.

+ BIO: Pedro Noguera

Pedro Noguera, PhD, is a professor in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. He is also the Executive Director of the Metropolitan Center for Urban Education and the co-Director of the Institute for the study of Globalization and Education in Metropolitan Settings (IGEMS).

An urban sociologist, Noguera's scholarship and research focuses on the ways in which schools are influenced by social and economic conditions in the urban environment. Noguera has served as an advisor and engaged in collaborative research with several large urban school districts throughout the United States. He has also done research on issues related to education and economic and social development in the Caribbean, Latin America and several other countries throughout the world.

Between 2000 and 2003, Noguera served as the Judith K. Dimon Professor of Communities and Schools at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. From 1990 to 2000, he was a Professor in Social and Cultural Studies at the Graduate School of Education and the Director of the Institute for the Study of Social Change at the University of California, Berkeley.

Partner
YWCA Boston
Series
African American Culture Series
Greater Boston: Project Dropout Series
Latino Culture Series