Disproportionate Minority Confinement

MON, JUN 2, 2003 (2:08:44)

A panel of members of law enforcement, advocacy, politics, youth activism, and community and faith-based organizations discusses the results of the Disproportionate Minority Confinement in Massachusetts report.

The ACLU headquarters in New York recently released a report on Disproportionate Minority Confinement in Massachusetts. The report specifically examines how black and latino youth are over-represented in every phase of the juvenile or criminal justice system, and offers recommendations to the Governor on how the state should address the issue. In conjunction with the report's release, the Northeastern University Institute on Race and Justice organized this community event with ACLU, Roxbury Defender's Office and Youth Advocacy Project to provide a forum for community response and dialogue around DMC as a state problem.

+ BIO: Carol Rose

Carol Rose is the Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts. A lawyer and journalist, Carol has spent her career working for and writing about human rights and civil liberties, both in the United States and abroad including Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, Japan, Sri Lanka, Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, Northern Ireland, and Vietnam.

Prior to assuming her position at the helm of the Massachusetts ACLU in January 2003, she was an attorney at the Boston law firm of Hill & Barlow, where she specialized in First Amendment and media law, intellectual property, civil rights, and international human rights law. While in private practice, Carol had the honor of serving as co-chair of Women in Communications Law of the ABA Forum on Communications Law, as a Vice Chair of the Human Rights committee of the ABA Individual Rights and Responsibilities section, and on the editorial board of the ABAs Human Rights magazine.

+ BIO: Amy Farrell

Dr. Farrell is an Assistant Professor in the College of Criminal Justice and the Associate Director of the Institute on Race and Justice at Northeastern University. Her research focuses on disparity in the criminal justice system. Primary interests include racial and gender differences the administration of justice, discretionary decision making, and prosecution and sentencing practices. She has recently conducted research on local law enforcement responses to human trafficking and is currently leading the development of a national human trafficking data collection program for the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Dr. Farrell is a co-recipient of the National Institute of Justices W.E.B. DuBois Fellowship on crime justice and culture.

NEU Institute on Race and Justice
African American Culture Series
Latino Culture Series
Latino Culture Series