Change Haiti Can Believe In: Part II

TUE, JAN 27, 2009 (5:35)

Paul Farmer, co-founder of Partners In Health; actor and activist Matt Damon, who recently visited Haiti to assist victims devastated by hurricanes; Massachusetts State Representative and Haitian-American Linda Dorcena Forry; and Brian Concannon, Jr., director of the Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti, share their stories of eradicating disease and injustice in one of the world's poorest nations, and discuss how changes in US policy can help to build a stronger, more resilient, and prosperous Haiti. Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now!, moderates.

+ BIO: Paul Farmer

Paul received his MD from Harvard Medical School and his PhD in anthropology from Harvard University. His years of academic training went far beyond libraries, classrooms and hospital clerkships. While still a medical student, Paul and colleagues founded Partners In Health, a nonprofit organization committed to providing health care to communities in the world's most remote regions. Today Partners In Health is rural Haiti's largest health care provider and serves millions of individuals and families in ten countries, including poorer areas within the United States. Through launching innovative community-based treatments for life-threatening diseases, Paul and his collaborators have demonstrated that quality health care can be delivered effectively to undeserved and resource-poor regions. Paul is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the Margaret Mead Award from the American Anthropological Association and the Outstanding International Physician (Nathan Davis) Award from the American Medical Association. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and has recently been elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.

+ BIO: Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman is the host and executive producer of Democracy Now!, a national, daily, independent, award-winning news program airing on over 750 TV and radio stations in North America. Goodman is the first journalist to receive the Right Livelihood Award, widely known as the Alternative Nobel Prize for developing an innovative model of truly independent grassroots political journalism that brings to millions of people the alternative voices that are often excluded by the mainstream media. She is also one of the the first recipients, along with Salon.com blogger Glenn Greenwald, of the Park Center for Independent Medias Izzy Award, named for the great muckraking journalist I.F. Stone. Goodman is the co-author with her brother, journalist David Goodman, of three New York Times bestsellers, Standing Up to the Madness: Ordinary Heroes in Extraordinary Times (2008), Static: Government Liars, Media Cheerleaders, and the People Who Fight Back (2006) and The Exception to the Rulers: Exposing Oily Politicians, War Profiteers, and the Media That Love Them (2004). Goodman has received the American Women in Radio and Television Gracie Award; the Paley Center for Medias Shes Made It Award; and the Puffin/Nation Prize for Creative Citizenship.

Partner
John F. Kennedy Library Foundation
Series
Aftershock: Coping with Disaster Series