The Black Church Never Left the Outdoors: Eco-Justice and Environmentalism

TUE, JAN 26, 2016

African Americans have a connection to and understanding of nature, rooted in Africa and going back generations in the United States. Theology, history, and contemporary experience can be traced through environmental activism in and through the church. This event, part of the Boston University's 2016-2017 School of Theology theme of Power, Privilege, and Prophetic Witness, delves deeply into African American and pan-African traditions of earth care.

Dianne Glave, Coordinator of Diversity Development with the Western Pennsylvania United Methodist Church Conference Center, and Rev. Dr. Kapya John Kaoma (BU School of Theology Class of 2010) are partners for this discussion.

(Photo: Flickr/David Goehring, resized)

+ BIO: Dianne Glave

Dianne Glave is the Coordinator of Diversity Development with the Western Pennsylvania United Methodist Church Conference Center, where she has also served as a pastor. Dr. Glave earned her Ph.D. in History with an emphasis on African American and environmental history. She has published a book titled Rooted in the Earth: Reclaiming the African American Environmental Heritage and co-edited another, titled To Love the Wind and the Rain: African American Environmental History.

+ BIO: Kapya John Kaoma

Rev. Dr. Kapya John Kaoma graduated from Boston University School of Theology in 2010. Rev. Dr. Kaoma is a scholar, pastor, and activist for international human rights.

Partner
Boston University School of Theology