Angela Belcher: Nature to Nanotechnology and Back

TUE, JUN 8, 2004 (21:38)

Angela Belcher discusses her work as a materials chemist with expertise in the fields of biomaterials, biomolecular materials, organic-inorganic interfaces and solid state chemistry. Belcher's work focuses on interfaces, which includes the interfaces of scientific disciplines as well as those of materials. In her group at MIT, nature is used as a guide for making novel electronic and magnetic materials and to pattern materials on nano-length scales. Belcher and her students are integrating approaches from several scientific disciplines, including materials chemistry, inorganic synthesis, surface chemistry, molecular biology, biochemistry and electrical engineering. They are adapting the conditions and control mechanisms found in nature to non-biological inorganic materials such as magnetic and semiconductor materials.

Angela Belcher received her BS in Creative Studies with an emphasis in biochemistry and molecular biology from The University of California Santa Barbara and earned a PhD in inorganic chemistry from that school in 1997. In 2003 Belcher was named among the "Top Ten Innovators Under 40" by Fortune Magazine, in 2002 Popular Science described her as among their "Brilliant Ten", and Technology Review noted her among the "Top 100 Inventors." In 2002, she was also named as one of 12 women expected to make the biggest impact in Chemistry in the next century by Chemical and Engineering.

+ BIO: Angela Belcher

Dr. Angela Belcher is a materials chemist with expertise in the fields of biomaterials, biomolecular materials, organic-inorganic interfaces and solid state chemistry. The focus of Dr. Belchers research is understanding and using the process by which nature makes materials in order to design novel hybrid organic-inorganic electronic and magnetic materials on new length scales. Her research is very interdisciplinary in nature and brings together the fields of inorganic chemistry, materials chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology and electrical engineering. Among her awards are the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (2000), and the Du Pont Young Investigators Award (1999). Her research was mentioned in a July 2001 Forbes magazine cover story on nanotechnology.

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